1962 Tipperary All Ireland Senior Hurling Champions

75.00

48cm x 59cm. Borrisokane Co Tipperary

Tom Moloughney: ‘It was a great aul’ Tipperary team, we should have won five-in-a-row’

It was the first All-Ireland final to be shown live on Telifis Eireann and the cameras had barely started rolling when Tipperary’s Tom Moloughney found the Wexford net. Brendan O’Brien rewinds the tape back to 1962 for our ‘Moment In Time’ series
Tom Moloughney, Jimmy Doyle, and Kieran Carey relax in the dressing room after Tipperary’s victory over Dublin in the 1961 All-Ireland final, a success that was to be repeated the following year. Picture from ‘The GAA — A People’s History’Tom Moloughney, Jimmy Doyle, and Kieran Carey relax in the dressing room after Tipperary’s victory over Dublin in the 1961 All-Ireland final, a success that was to be repeated the following year. Picture from ‘The GAA — A People’s History’It seemed as if most of Croke Park had been caught on the hop. A cameraman was still scrambling for the sideline as the Archbishop of Cashel and Emly, Dr Morris, threw the ball in and the game was only clearing its throat when Wexford were hit with a pair of blows that would have felled a team buttressed by lesser men.

“Two goals in eighty seconds set champions for victory,” was the sub-heading in the Cork Examiner the next day. The paper’s correspondent detailed how reporters were still straightening their papers and spectators in the crowd of 75,039 were finding their seats, or a perch on the terracing, when the drama spilled over like a boiled kettle.

Close to 58 years have passed since the two counties lit up what was a dull and sometimes wet September afternoon in the capital but the fog of time clears in an instant as Tom Moloughney recalls those opening credits. Both goals are broken down play by play. The only aspect that ever escapes him was his opening score’s wider significance.

“I never heard any talk of it really,” Moloughney explained yesterday. “One fella reminded me of the TV thing lately. I had forgotten.”

Everything else? Crystal clear.

His slice of history began with a sideline cut from Theo English that found its way to him after Liam Devaney tangled with an opponent. The finish was, by all accounts, a blistering one from a man whose superb second-half goal for Kilruane MacDonaghs against Thurles Sarsfields in the 1959 Tipperary North final had been one of the prompts for the county to turn to him in the first place.

Wexford had more coming.

 

Description

Additional information

Weight 5 kg
Dimensions 65 × 80 × 10 cm